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 Dictionary my best option?
#1
I am still a beginner and would like to know the best way to approach my task -- whether to structure my data table as a list or dictionary or something else?

The best way to describe my data table is to picture an Excel table with 50 rows and 47 columns.

Column 1 consists of 50 unique two-letter codes (this would by my "key" in a dictionary).  Columns 2 through 48 have variables/numbers (one per column) associated/linked with the unique two-letter code in column 1.

As a beginner, I have used a dictionary to ".get" one variable associated with a unique key.

However, what if I need to .get 47 variables based on the two-letter unique key?  Is that possible with a dictionary?  Is it easy to grab/identify each variable with some kind of loop or something? 

I know this may not be enough information, but it is the best way for me to describe my task
thanks for looking
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#2
Quote:As a beginner, I have used a dictionary to ".get" one variable associated with a unique key.

However, what if I need to .get 47 variables based on the two-letter unique key?  Is that possible with a dictionary?  Is it easy to grab/identify each variable with some kind of loop or something? 
yes a for loop. 

You can also just return a list of keys via MY_DICTIONARY.keys() and a list of values with MY_DICTIONARY.values()

If you need to specify the key and not get all you can just loop them and insert an if condition to get the key/value pairs you want

for k,v in MY_DICTIONARY.items():
    #insert if condition here to check key for more filtering
    #k is the key
    #v is the value of that key
Post your code for more explicit help
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#3
thanks for the reply -- I need to learn a little more about dictionaries. Happy New Year
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#4
Hello!
You can feed a dictionary key with every type of data, objects. You can have nested structures of data. 
Or this:

In [1]: def foo():
   ...:     return 'foo'
   ...: 

In [2]: def bar():
   ...:     return 'bar'
   ...: 

In [3]: d = {'bob': [foo, bar]}

In [4]: d['bob'][0]() == d['bob'][1]()
Out[4]: False
"As they say in Mexico 'dosvidaniya'. That makes two vidaniyas."
https://freedns.afraid.org
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#5
dictionary keys are limited to hashable objects.
What do you call someone who speaks three languages? Trilingual. Two languages? Bilingual. One language? American.
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#6
I didn't mean the key itself
"As they say in Mexico 'dosvidaniya'. That makes two vidaniyas."
https://freedns.afraid.org
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#7
yeah, the values can be anything, but quite a lot of stuff can be keys.
What do you call someone who speaks three languages? Trilingual. Two languages? Bilingual. One language? American.
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#8
To be clear to the beginners, dictionary keys can be immutable objects like ints, floats, strings, and tuples. They can't be mutable objects like lists, dictionaries, or sets.
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
I wish you happiness.
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#9
for fun trivia: i made a little dictionary with keys of many different functions (references).
What do you call someone who speaks three languages? Trilingual. Two languages? Bilingual. One language? American.
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