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 Python 3 x86 vs x64 Inquiry...
#1
Good afternoon everyone, I hope all of you are having a blessed Summer. Today after doing some research on Python 3 for Windows I decided to install and run x86 vs x64 since some libraries (that I will likely not use for some time as a new programmer) have yet to be converted to x64. Basically, I am playing it safe.

Or is my research wrong? Is x64 the new go-to? I do not feel I am going to notice a difference between the two, but if there is a valid reason to consider x64 over x86 I would love to hear it.

I am a new programmer. My system was hit by a surge of lightning a few nights ago and I lost everything on my backup HDD due to file corruption. So I have since installed a fresh Windows 10 Pro and removed the dual-boot into Ubuntu (I now run it on a VM). My total install with everything installed and backed up for a refresh is now 36GB (I left all of my games off of my PC to focus on learning Python programming).

Is there any benefit to x64 at all?

Sent from my Sheikah Slate,
-Rod
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#2
well, for one, the range of 64 bits is oxffffffff or 4,294,967,295 decimal
and 32 bits is 0xffff or 65,535 decimal
this means that addresses up to that value can put on the address buss most likely with 1 computer cycle
That of course can vary with the hardware, but you can see the potential difference.
since you are dealing an base 2, every bit added doubles the maximum direct address by 2.
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#3
I do not foresee myself coding a program that will utilize anything near 65.5K decimal places. At least not in the foreseeable future. I got to thinking, I can always upgrade if the need arises. In terms of speed I am understanding that x86 speed vs x64 speed, the difference is not noticeable. Thank you. Playing it safe will work for now as I learn.
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#4
There was a lot of complaints when Python 3 came out, mostly because there were many modules not converted from v2 to v3. The problem is, some of those remaining modules may never be converted, simply because they've been abandoned or it is a large program, with few contributors or they wanted to add new features and such before releasing the v3 compatible product. An example would be wxPython, which only just recently released a stable Python 3 version. I had to abandon it's use when I switched to Python 3 as did many others, I would imagine. Now they have to work to get all those people back. I have to say though, given some of the posts and links by Larz60+ it certainly deserves another look.

The same complaints were made when OS's moved from 32 bit to 64 bit. You have to remember that a 32 bit program will run on a 64 bit machine but a 64 bit program will not run on a 32 bit machine. The other thing to remember is technology doesn't go backwards. Python will go to version 4 and OS's will go to 128 bit or more.

As a new programmer, you will end up writing your own programs, whether just for yourself or a larger community, so you have to ask yourself, are you more apt to to target Python 2 or Python 3? Are you more apt to target a 32 bit system or a 64 bit?

It's sometimes good to be "safe", but when you are just starting out, why bother? Go for it.
RodNintendeaux likes this post
If it ain't broke, I just haven't gotten to it yet.
OS: Windows 10, openSuse 42.3, freeBSD 11, Raspian "Stretch"
Python 3.6.5, IDE: PyCharm 2018 Community Edition
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#5
(May-30-2017, 10:12 PM)sparkz_alot Wrote: As a new programmer, you will end up writing your own programs, whether just for yourself or a larger community, so you have to ask yourself, are you more apt to to target Python 2 or Python 3? Are you more apt to target a 32 bit system or a 64 bit?

It's sometimes good to be "safe", but when you are just starting out, why bother? Go for it.

For now, it is just me that I am writing these for, but hope to branch out for the wife and/or family for creative ideas later. The more I research it the more safe x64 seems; as in your statement above, many have been converted or are being converted. I have a beast of a system (custom built this four years ago), it is not like x64 is going to slow it down. With 16GB DDR3, a Core i7-4771 and a GeForce 770X I am set in terms of raw processing power.
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#6
If you have a core i7-4774, which is a 64 bit CPU, and you're running a 32 bit OS, what your
processor actually has to do is to slow itself down by inserting what are called wait states in
order to run the 32 bit OS. In other words you are cheating yourself.
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#7
(May-31-2017, 12:21 AM)Larz60+ Wrote: If you have a core i7-4774, which is a 64 bit CPU, and you're running a 32 bit OS, what your
processor actually has to do is to slow itself down by inserting what are called wait states in
order to run the 32 bit OS. In other words you are cheating yourself.

I am running x64 Windows.
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#8
so why not run software that can take advantage of what you bought?
I would only run a 32 bit program if that's all that is available. I'll always opt
for the 64 bit version if available.
RodNintendeaux likes this post
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#9
Rod, I'd have to agree with Larz60+ on this one. If you are running 64 bit Windows, you should also run 64 bit Python. I'll even go so far as to suggest you use the latest version on Python (currently 3.6.1). Would I be correct in presuming that your Ubuntu is also 64 bit? If so, it also is running the 64 bit versions of Python 2 and Python 3, so why not do the same with Windows?

Also, since you are just beginning Python and are using Windows, I strongly urge you to bookmark this site Windows Binaries. There are are quite a few libraries that need to be compiled, and by default, Windows does not have a compiler. This site has taken many of these and pre-compiled them. So if you try to install a library and run into errors, try this site to see if there is a pre-compiled version available. Make sure you download the version that matches your Python version and whether 32 or 64 bit. Also make note of any prerequisites that need to be installed first. Once downloaded you simply have to type in it's location, for example if you download to you download directory, in the cmd terminal type pip install c:\users\rod\downloads\filename.whl
If it ain't broke, I just haven't gotten to it yet.
OS: Windows 10, openSuse 42.3, freeBSD 11, Raspian "Stretch"
Python 3.6.5, IDE: PyCharm 2018 Community Edition
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#10
(May-31-2017, 10:10 AM)Larz60+ Wrote: so why not run software that can take advantage of what you bought?
I would only run a 32 bit program if that's all that is available. I'll always opt
for the 64 bit version if available.

(May-31-2017, 01:46 PM)sparkz_alot Wrote: Rod, I'd have to agree with Larz60+ on this one. If you are running 64 bit Windows, you should also run 64 bit Python. I'll even go so far as to suggest you use the latest version on Python (currently 3.6.1). Would I be correct in presuming that your Ubuntu is also 64 bit? If so, it also is running the 64 bit versions of Python 2 and Python 3, so why not do the same with Windows?

Also, since you are just beginning Python and are using Windows, I strongly urge you to bookmark this site Windows Binaries. There are are quite a few libraries that need to be compiled, and by default, Windows does not have a compiler. This site has taken many of these and pre-compiled them. So if you try to install a library and run into errors, try this site to see if there is a pre-compiled version available. Make sure you download the version that matches your Python version and whether 32 or 64 bit. Also make note of any prerequisites that need to be installed first. Once downloaded you simply have to type in it's location, for example if you download to you download directory, in the cmd terminal type pip install c:\users\rod\downloads\filename.whl

Alright, alright. I have uninstalled 32-bit and installed the 64-bit version. Obviously there is no concern with this version so my answer is found. I didn't even think of Ubuntu running 64-bit; I am such a dunce.

I will look into these binaries. Is there a tutorial on how/when to use these?

And thank y'all. Seriously, I am grateful for all of your advice.

-Rod
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