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The best Programming books?
#21
Quote:After all, why do things the hard way when you can just talk to it. Even though you may talk for a very long time before the program you want to create is completed.
Say this: http://www.terminally-incoherent.com/blo...-the-word/
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#22
(Jan-09-2019, 06:12 PM)micseydel Wrote: I do suspect that programming will become more machine aided than it currently is. I'm actually surprised by how little it is at this point

I think part of the problem is that people are aiming this stuff at non-programmer audiences, like managers (SAS), researchers (SPSS), and kids (Mindstorms). I don't think they're aiming tools at programmers so much.

I also think humans don't understand how to do it well. We build packages for each other to use, but those packages can then limit the person implementing them. One of the problems with the web application at my last job was the "spreadsheet" interface. But that was a third-party application, and our developers couldn't or wouldn't mess with it.
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Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
I wish you happiness.
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#23
https://blog.codinghorror.com/recommende...evelopers/

I love Jeff Atwood's blog, and his list of books is pretty great, none of which are tied to any particular language.

I also recommend Seven Languages in Seven Weeks (https://www.amazon.com/dp/193435659X/). It introduces languages across a variety of domains to show different programming thought processes (it has Ruby, which is similar to Python, then it also has Haskell and Clojure, which are radically different).

Land of Lisp (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1593272812/) is also well written, but is obviously only helpful for specifically learning Common Lisp.
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#24
(Jan-09-2019, 08:27 PM)nilamo Wrote: https://blog.codinghorror.com/recommende...evelopers/

This list is pretty good, but I would avoid Tufte. As a statistician with a strong interest in the graphical display of information, I had real problems with Tufte. I would suggest William Cleveland instead (The Elements of Graphing Data and Visualizing Data) instead.
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
I wish you happiness.
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#25
in the blog refered by nilamo, jeff Atwood states:
Quote:average programmer reads less than one technical book per year
Then I guess that all of the programmers that I know are not average, as I think all of them read more like one a month.
I read the first 'Code' book and enjoyed it so much I bought several and gave them away.

Also have programming Perls (1st edition), and rate it highly.
And regular expression cookbook should be a requirement.


I haven't read 'Land of Lisp' but am one of the few people in the world that still uses lisp (actually in conjunction with Python, especially with music notation (LilyPond) software). I think I'll put this one on my list.
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#26
I'm below average. I haven't read a new technical book in a couple years. I should get that copy of Applied Cryptography off my shelf and work though it.
micseydel and metulburr like this post
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
I wish you happiness.
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#27
And then there's the book none of us have mentioned, and I'm sure all have either read or keep a copy for reference
The Dragon book!

'Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools' now in second edition by Aho, Ullman, Lam, Sethi

This is where I got my hashing algorithm that I modified and used for many years, one of the major phone companies used it for their call record processing, and may still use some tower code that used it as well.
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#28
I found the best beginners guide to python was "Help your kids with computer coding" By DK. The first half was scratch, and the other half was python. If your new to programming, this is a great book. It appears to be simple, but it has a lot of good advice. I learned a lot from it.
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