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worst variable name
#21
Or, I had to debug a program where the original author who thought
it would be cool to name his variables after his family members.
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#22
Oh, it can be a real problem. My boss started intentionally obfuscating his code, because a woman who used to work there started changing his code and then complaining that his programs didn't work.

And git may be easy to set up for you and me, but getting our IT department to set up git? I don't know about that. Especially since the back up system for our local hard drives once wiped out six months of data on my machine. I now have my most important files stored in a location the back up system doesn't check. I don't even want to think about what would happen to our code if they installed git.
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
Buddhist, biker, poet, coder, theist
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#23
If the backup system wipes out data, can't you just restore the previous day's backup?
Or start storing your files in the cloud, like Google Drive?

git is all just files. You could setup a git repo, and then store it in a shared google drive account. That sounds like it'd solve most of your problems, since you could check the commit logs to see who's changing what in which files, so he could ask her why she broke the file she needs.
It's dangerous to go alone!  Take this: https://docs.python.org/3/library/index.html
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#24
(Jun-06-2017, 11:12 PM)nilamo Wrote: If the backup system wipes out data, can't you just restore the previous day's backup?
Or start storing your files in the cloud, like Google Drive?

git is all just files.  You could setup a git repo, and then store it in a shared google drive account.  That sounds like it'd solve most of your problems, since you could check the commit logs to see who's changing what in which files, so he could ask her why she broke the file she needs.

It was never able to restore the six months of data I'd lost. Thankfully it wasn't work data, which was stored on the network drive as mandated, but it was all my productivity notes on the work I'd done, notes on projects I was working on, notes on who I'd sent things to, and so on.

Setting up a external git repo would do no good, since we can't set up git on our machines to get the files. We have no administrative rights on our laptops, and cannot install any software without approval in writing from our supervisor and IT. Even if we could do it, they would probably consider it a violation of our computer usage agreement, and threaten to revoke our network access until we took it down. We're forbidden from using ftp, I doubt they want us using git or google drive.
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
Buddhist, biker, poet, coder, theist
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#25
(Jun-06-2017, 11:12 PM)nilamo Wrote: If the backup system wipes out data, can't you just restore the previous day's backup?
Or start storing your files in the cloud, like Google Drive?

git is all just files.  You could setup a git repo, and then store it in a shared google drive account.  That sounds like it'd solve most of your problems, since you could check the commit logs to see who's changing what in which files, so he could ask her why she broke the file she needs.

it was probably not actually backing up the data, or encrypting the backup with the wrong key. it's always a good thing to test backups regularly but i bet 99+% of IT departments never do. seen too often: bad backup tapes with error messages regularly ignored

i make backups to hard drives now days using rsync in reverse-increment mode. that's another script i need to rewrite into Python some day.

i had to access my backups tonight. i had mangled my ssh keys when setting up access to a new server and lost access to another server. trying all my keys failed so i was looking there assuming i had deleted one. turns out i was using the wrong user name and really had not lost access. two hours wasted but it could have been worse if i was using tapes as i would be restoring instead of just checking checksums.
Skaaaaaperen........
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