Python Forum

Full Version: If statement with arrays without activating while statement
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
import time #importing time fuction

Answer1 = ["Push Walls", "PUSH WALLS", "push walls", "Push walls", "push Walls"] #Array of all possible answers.
Answer2 = ["Red Green Yellow", "Red, Green, Yellow", "red green yellow", "Red green yellow", "red Green yellow", "red green Yellow", "red, green, yellow",
           "Red, green, yellow", "red, Green, yellow", "red, green, Yellow", "RED GREEN YELLOW", "RED, GREEN, YELLOW"] #Array of all possible answers.
Answer3 = ["Look Up", "look Up", "LOOK UP", "look up"] #Array of all possible answers.
lives = 3
correct = False

#introduction
def intro():
    #envelope art
    env = """
         __________________
        |\                /|
        | \              / | 
        | /\____________/\ | 
        |/                \| 
        |__________________| 
        """
    print(env)
    time.sleep(0.5)
    print("""You have been invited to the worlds leading puzzle room...
          ...You accept the invitation and are escorted to the the first room.""")
    time.sleep(0.5)

#main story
def main():
    intro() #introduction
    ######
    room1() #having separate defs for rooms makes adding / removing rooms easier.
  
    







def room1():
    global lives #making lives global so it can be accessed from outoflives()
    time.sleep(0.5)
    print("""
          On the wall in the first room, there is an alpahbet on the wall...
          ...It must be a Caesar cipher of +3. The encrypted word is: SXVK ZDOOV """)
    global correct
    correct1 = input("Decrypted Cipher:")
    
    for x in range(0,5):
        if (correct1 == Answer1[x]):
            correct = True
            print("lol")
        else:
            outoflives()
            correct = False

#called if you lose
def lose():
    print("")
    time.sleep(2)
    main()

#called if you win
def win():
    print("")
    time.sleep(2)
    main()

def outoflives():
    global lives
    if correct == False:
        while lives != 0:
            print("The walls close in...")
            break
    while lives == 0:
        print("You died!")
        lose()
        break
main()
---This is a project for school---

The arrays are showing all possible answers. In room1(), this piece of code should compare the answer you put in to all the items in the array:
 for x in range(0,5):
        if (correct1 == Answer1[x]):
            correct = True
            print("correct")
        else:
            lives = 2
            outoflives()
            correct = False

It does. But all the answers except one, will be incorrect. This activates the outflives() multiple times making the output look like:
The walls close in...
The walls close in...
The walls close in...
correct
The walls close in...

I want it to look like:
correct
if you get the correct answer and:
The walls close in...
if you get the wrong answer.

What would be the easeist way to get this to stop?

Thanks,
Dream
Well, you could use the in operator, which sees if any one of the items in a container equals a specific value:

if correct1 in Answer1:
Then you could get rid of the for loop and just have the if/else clause. However, it appears you are only using Answer1 to handle different ways to capitalize 'push walls'. This is generally done with the lower method of the string, which converts it to lower case:

if correct1.lower() == 'push walls':
Your use of global is problematic. You'll run into problems with multiple different variables using slightly different names. You should pass values to the functions as parameters, and get results out of them with return statements. This way you can pass values between functions without clogging the global namespace.

If you want to expand this you are going to have multiple functions doing similar things, and the code is going to be hard to maintain. If you find a problem in one function, you'll have to correct it in all of the similar functions. Much better is to keep the rooms and the information about the rooms in some sort of data structure, and to have functions that can operate on the information for any room, and keep track of where you are in the rooms. See the text adventures tutorial link in my signature for an example of how to do this.
Thanks for that, I will try this out soon!

Dream

It works, thanks!