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Funny English
#21
Yes, they do.
Check out Merriam-Websters definition (with a little humor, I believe, thrown in) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/regardless.  Since "regardless" has seniority, I believe it wins  Smile
If it ain't broke, I just haven't gotten to it yet.
OS: Windows 10, openSuse 42.2, freeBSD 11;Python 3.6, IDE: PyCharm 2016 Community Edition
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#22
Merriam Webster says:


Quote:First Known Use of regardless

1591

Did You Know?

Regardless is rather simply derived from the noun regard (meaning "attention" or "concern") plus -less - nothing too shocking about that. But poor regardless became embroiled in a usage scandal through no fault of its own when people began using irregardless as its synonym (probably blending irrespective and regardless). Irregardless originated in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century, and usage commentators have been decrying it since the 1920s, often declaring "there is no such word." Irregardless does exist, of course, but it tends to be used primarily in speech and it is still considered nonstandard. Regardless is greatly preferred.

Shocked
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#23
(Jan-12-2017, 02:20 PM)sparkz_alot Wrote: Since "regardless" has seniority, I believe it wins

Since "irregardless" annoys grammarians, I believe it wins. Tongue
micseydel likes this post
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien
Minimalist, buddhist, theist, and programmer
xenomind.com
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#24
I would like to announciate that for all intesive purposes,
that we shouldn't misunderestimate our conversate on the subject.
But that a whole nother ting, irregardless, I could care less.
Kebap likes this post
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#25
(Jan-12-2017, 02:20 PM)sparkz_alot Wrote: Yes, they do.
Check out Merriam-Websters definition (with a little humor, I believe, thrown in) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/regardless.  Since "regardless" has seniority, I believe it wins  Smile

wins what?

the meaning is the meaning.  a word is a reference to the meaning.  there can be two references to the same.

irregardless = regardless
now both have the same meaning.


what is legit in our language depends on what we want to accept.  we have accepted a lot of strange junk.
Skaaaaaperen........
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#26
(Jan-13-2017, 04:25 AM)Skaperen Wrote: a word is a reference to the meaning.

Ooh, when you start talking theories of reference, you start getting into deep philosophical weeds.
Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien
Minimalist, buddhist, theist, and programmer
xenomind.com
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