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 New Users Introduce Yourself
#1
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Please feel welcome to use this thread to introduce yourself to the forum.
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#2
I've been a regular on the forum since 2005, contributor since 2009, and moderator since... 2013ish? And operator on the IRC since 2011. I got into programming when I was 15, doing Python for fun, and now at 25 I've gotten a CS degree from UC Davis and am now a professional software engineer in silicon valley. I was at LinkedIn until July and now I work at Tile (they make the tiny bluetooth finder you may have seen/heard about). Python is still my primary go-to, though I also use Scala and at work I use Java. I really look forward to type hinting developing in Python so that I can use it more than Scala, though I do not hate Scala. I started using Linux around the same time as Python. I do barefoot and minimalist running in my free time and I've developed a recent interest in epistemology. Feel free to ping me about absolutely any of this  =D

To regulars: should we make this a forum instead of a thread? It gets messy when people want to reply, and would be gnarly if two parallel conversations were ongoing.
Feel like you're not getting the answers you want? Checkout the help/rules for things like what to include/not include in a post, how to use code tags, how to ask smart questions, and more.

Pro-tip - there's an inverse correlation between the number of lines of code posted and my enthusiasm for helping with a question :)
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#3
I'm another old regular on the forum, but I don't remember how long I've been here. I do remember learning to program when I was 10. My dad got an HP-85 and told me I could have my own tape for the tape drive if I learned BASIC. I've been hooked ever since. I got into Python when I was mentoring at a place called Computers4Kids. The kid I was mentoring wanted to learn programming, and Python is what came up in a google search for "easy to learn programming language." I've been hooked ever since. At work I'm in charge of the Consumer Product Safety Risk Management System, part of which feeds into the publicly searchable database on SaferProducts.gov. As part of that, I occasionally get to do some SAS programming.

@micseydel: I don't think we need a forum. There aren't that many replies, and new users don't come in fast enough to mix up the replies.
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Craig "Ichabod" O'Brien - xenomind.com
I wish you happiness.
Recommended Tutorials: BBCode, functions, classes, text adventures

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#4
Hello,

I'm another regular since Dec 2013.

Retired (don't want to be) software engineer in the field of telecommunications and spectra-chemical instrumentation.
Have been designing and writing code since 1968. Wrote first 'program' in 1965.
Early pioneer with microcomputer systems, and author with Kilobaud magazine (1970's)
70+ years old - still going.

Larz60+
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#5
So at 60+ I'm a youngster... :)

Professionally I'm an "architect" in an IT consulting company. Wrote my first code in '77 (how do you say printf("Hello world\n") in Fortran?). I use Python both for work and pleasure.
Unless noted otherwise, code in my posts should be understood as "coding suggestions", and its use may require more neurones than the two necessary for Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V.
Your one-stop place for all your GIMP needs: gimp-forum.net
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#6
Hi, I'm a dabbler who rarely posts, but I've written a couple of workable applications and I've got a few others in mind.  I'm far from being a competent programmer, but I'm a decent geologist, and Python is the perfect tool for creating the kinds of applications I like to use on the job. Currently trying to get up to speed in PyQT5, and hopefully Django in the near future.
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#7
i'm new to here, registered a few days ago. i've been on the old site a couple years. i have been doing python, off and on, since about 8 years ago an regularly for the past 3 years. i have stopped programming in C but at times still do fixes to existing stuff. my intent is to convert things to python, both C programs and bash scripts. a lot of what i decide to write reflects needs inherited from past coding but may no longer be needed. python is very close to what i have wanted of a language for many years. the indent based syntax is not, but over time i have it to be a good thing for programming, boosting python's orientation to improving development speed and ease.
What do you call someone who speaks three languages? Trilingual. Two languages? Bilingual. One language? American.
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#8
I am Sunil and I am new to this forum.:)


User has been warned for this post. Reason: Dont make offtopic posts with suspicious links
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#9
G'day mates! I'm a returning chap from the old forums. <clears throat... no one remembers me?> :P
Anyways, I'm a professional Python dabbler, whatever that is. I've been using python for about 2 years and I still learn something new every time I start a project. Keeps my brain young, anyhow.

Cheers!
Fred
OS: Arch
Editor: Atom with Material Syntax UI and the Termination terminal plugin

Micah 6:8
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#10
I was a member of the old forum. And the one before that...

I started using Python beginning with version 1.4. The language was a little different back then but the overall aesthetics haven't changed too much. My background is mathematics and I maintain the gmpy2 library. (gmpy2 supports arbitrary-precision integer, rational, real, and complex arithmetic.)

casevh
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